Ten Qualities of Successful Family Businesses

Drew Mendoza
Drew Mendoza

This week’s blog is an easy-to-grasp list of 10 qualities I’ve noticed about the underpinnings of high-functioning family businesses over the last 25 years. These are not things I made up. They are philosophies and guiding principles of families I’ve been honored to serve and speak with.

  1. Estate planning is NOT continuity planning. Confuse them at your peril. Estate planning is necessary but usually not sufficient. Continuity planning will include these critical matters: leadership transitions of the company, the board and the family; the rules that govern the board, compensation and performance measures; company strategy; shareholder education; and your vision and purpose for being in business together.
  2. Family meetings should help plan for future generations of ownership and encourage leadership, fun, shareholder development and meaning. If the meeting does not work out as well as hoped the first time, give in and go hire an expert to facilitate the conversations that are required. And, while we’re on this subject, another reason to use an outside facilitator is because it is hard to come across as neutral and objective when you’ve got a large stake in the outcome of the conversation. Being a member of the family, an employee of the business or a member of the board may skew your thinking and ability to seem unbiased to everyone else in the room.
  3. The family will need expectations aligned around many areas including their expectations for growth, risk, profitability, liquidity, purpose and policies like how we select leaders and who can be on the board.
  4. Salary, bonus and distributions/dividends are different. I’ve seen many a family co-mingle them in order to minimize or avoid tax liabilities. For families that intend to continue the business to the next generation, this is frequently the source of big problems later on.
  5. Have an appropriate, functioning corporate governance structure.
  6. Run the business and the board as a meritocracy.
  7. Beware of conflicted advisors.
  8. A leadership change will likely take five to 10 years of preparation and execution and another three to five years for the new leader to get their sea legs. All concerned must commit to hang on and work through the difficult times that sometimes arise. Remember that although we’re related, we usually view aspects of our realities differently from one another.
  9. The transition of the company’s ownership and leadership is a dynamic strategic imperative that will benefit from having the right foundational building blocks in place. Know your values and divine a strategy that reflects those values. Be honest with yourself and each other. Have thoughtful policies about compensation, the purpose of profits (in all their forms), the responsibilities and purpose of ownership, and be open to accountability.
  10. Be patient with one another and the process of transitioning leadership and ownership of an enterprise.

If one or more of these strike you as something you’d like to read more about, let me know.  I’ll be happy to introduce you to articles and books specific to each of these 10 points.  And, by the way, each of these points can be a discussion item for shareholder, family or governance meetings.

To contact Drew Mendoza, Managing Principal, please call (773) 604-5005 or email mendoza@thefbcg.com.

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