Age and Appreciation

Amy Schuman
Amy Schuman

I turned 60 this summer. I feel as energized, curious and active as ever. But, I do notice a few significant differences.

A source of great pleasure is spending time with family. Sitting on the floor and trading monosyllables (mostly ‘Ga!’ and ‘Da!’) with my 9-month old granddaughter is one of my greatest joys.  If I had a choice between seeing a prize-winning movie, hearing an award-winning orchestra, eating a gourmet meal or feeding strained peas to the baby, I would take the latter without batting an eyelash.  Quite different from when, as a young parent, I longed to get out of the kitchen and away from the babytalk and mashed vegetables.

Professionally, a source of great pleasure is sharing observations and insights with colleagues.  Collaborating as part of a team in support of client success is much more satisfying than being a heroic (and more limited) solo practitioner, even if it takes more time and some patience. I recently co-authored a book on Human Resources in the Family Business (coming from Palgrave McMillan in November) with Wendy Sage-Hayward and David Ransburg, two of my FBCG colleagues. Learning and creating together took a bit more time, but it was fun to tussle, disagree, and thus synthesize new insights together.

And, it’s not like I’ve stopped exploring. My late-in-life interest in mindfulness has taken me to retreats in Germany, France, New York and California, and introduced me to a wonderful variety of practitioners from around the world.

I’ve been reading Atul Gawande’s wonderful book, Being Mortal. He talks about the changes that come with age — how people tend to focus more on what’s known and familiar, as vs. seeking new experiences and acquaintances. How people enjoy slowing down, doing less, going deeper rather than wider. He points to research that links this  —  not to aging, or decrepitude  —  but to a sense that the time ahead can be short, and that every moment is precious.

These pleasures, of course, are available to us regardless of age. We don’t have to wait for age 60 to appreciate our loved ones or our teammates.

We can take a moment to appreciate their presence at every age.

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