The family council dream team

Steve McClure
Steve McClure

In my family, we don’t wait for the basketball madness to start in March.

Last weekend, we watched the NBA all-star game and three-point shooting contest. Next week, my youngest son starts his high school basketball post-season playoffs. And next month during his spring break, we are taking a trip scheduled around a particular NBA game. Needless to say, at home we are talking a lot about players, teams and teamwork.

I don’t talk to my family much about Family Council teamwork, but I think about it a lot and see it firsthand every week.  Like a basketball team, the best Family Councils are teams with the right skills and attitudes.  Larger families with many choices have the luxury of selecting their best talent.  Business families who include spouses as candidates for the Family Council expand their talent pool.

When assembling the Family Council dream team, pick at least one who can be the Chair to galvanize and manage the team. He or she communicates well, facilitates, never bosses -yet can be directive when needed – and is great with follow up so that individuals are accountable. This team manager is the kind of person who can make a good idea seem like everyone’s and can tell the truth about what’s going on without an uncomfortable confrontation.

The chair is joined by some great teammates, all of whom:

  • Get things done by keeping conference call appointments and taking responsibility for Family Council tasks/projects without over-committing.
  • Can be flexible and adaptable about the family’s changing needs, yet be rigidly firm on values.
  • Understand the differences between the roles of shareholder, board, management and family and can respect the boundaries.
  • Have the spunk to decide what is right, rather than siding with an individual or family group (especially their own).
  • Are capable of working with differences among individuals, branches and generations.
  • Can inform, listen, respect and build trusting relationships across family branches.
  • Have the diplomacy to keep their mouth shut about sensitive matters but love to blab with the best of them on everything else the Family Council is doing.
  • Can respect, support and help the Chair accomplish the difficult, underpaid, cat-herding job – instead of pushing the buttons of their courageous brother, cousin, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew, father, mother or sister who agreed to do it.

Anything missing?  What talents do you value on a Family Council?

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