The World Cup as Metaphor

Amy Schuman
Amy Schuman

The brightest oranges, whitest whites, deepest navy blues, sun-ray yellows: each World Cup game brings a different color combination to the field but that is just the surface excitement. Are the players tall, long-legged, loping and passing the ball in graceful arcs from toe to toe, using the entire length and breadth of the field? Or are they short and compact, firing the ball in focused staccato bursts shaped like tight triangles that keep mostly to the field just in front of the goal? Does the team wait until the final 5 minutes to unleash the full power of their athleticism, or do they hit the goal, hard, in the first 60 seconds of play? Who flips and flops on the field after the appearance of a foul, and who springs up for more play after being flung to the ground or elbowed in the face? Who lingers to clasp their opponent’s hand, to speak with them face to face, trading jerseys, and who falls to the ground, on their knees, in tears, in private pain?

The World Cup may be one sport, with one objective, but week after week it has served up a rich feast of group dynamics and individual drama. Innumerable variations were played on the themes of strategy and opportunism, physical power and mental command, supremacy and surrender and ultimately, victory.

Many paths to success. A lesson to inspire us all.

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