Employee Appreciation

David Ransburg
David Ransburg

I grew up in a family business, a sprinkler manufacturing company in Peoria, Illinois. My father ran this business for nearly 40 years, and I had the privilege of working in this business myself. While not every decision my father made turned out to be right, he made many excellent decisions. One of the very best was instituting an annual event he called “Employee Appreciation Day.”

Briefly, Employee Appreciation Day consisted of all office workers spending one day in the company’s factory or warehouse, laboring alongside the regular employees of those areas. This event served a number of purposes. First and most generally, it brought employees together for a full day, thus breaking down some of the structural barriers inherent to these separate functional areas.

Second, this day of direct interaction provided more specific knowledge that was helpful to all employees. For example, working on the assembly line allowed sales people to better understand how the products worked and to better appreciate the care that went into the creation of each item. Manufacturing employees could share process improvement suggestions with managers they wouldn’t otherwise see.

Most importantly, Employee Appreciation Day (which included a pizza lunch for all employees) strengthened the company’s conscious culture of cohesiveness and collaboration — a culture that provided the company with a competitive advantage in the marketplace.

What strategies have you tried for strengthening the culture of your family business?

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